More Canon 1DC

So today I got to spend another couple of hours with the 1DC.  I wish I could spend a whole week full time playing with this camera, but other things call on me as well… 🙂  My impression is still Wow.  This camera puts out a really nice image. I’ve shot mostly in daylight outside today but also some interior shots.

We’ll start outdoors. Everything shot in Canon Log.  Very nice dynamic range. Hard tough light and great test conditions.  Sunlit snow and shadows.  All images are shot with sharpening set to 0, unless otherwise noted in the caption.  There is some banding in the sky.  UPDATE:  Confirmed by several sources this is more apparent when shooting below 400 ISO.

Canon1Dc_08
Ungraded. Shot at iso100, f10, 0.9 ND. A foam core bounce.  The clear ice on the right is clipped and could’t be saved.
Some quick adjustments and a little sharpen.
Some quick adjustments and a little sharpen.

 

Canon1Dc_09
Hard sun, no diffusion, no fill on right side.
Canon1Dc_09_GR
Hard sun, no diffusion, no fill on right side. A quick contrast adjustment and slight post sharpen.

I also wanted to know what sharpen (in Canon Log meny) would do to the image.  A lot, it would show.  The +2 setting really made a big difference in sharpening, almost to the point that next to the image with no sharpening, it looked too sharp and electronic. +4 I can’t think of any use for and then the scale goes all the way up to +7…    I wish in retrospect I would have tried 0,1,2 instead of 0,2,4.

Sharpen 0
Sharpen 0
Sharpen +2
Sharpen +2
0 Sharpen
0 Sharpen
+2 Sharpen
+2 Sharpen
+4 Sharpen
+4 Sharpen

The camera really has a lot of latitude and plays really nice with the sun and the snow.

Interior shots.  1 light (2K openface through 216) no fill.

f4, ISO200, 0 Sharp
f4, ISO200, 0 Sharp

Here are 2 frames shot at ISO 6400.

0 sharpen, IOS6400
0 sharpen, IOS6400
+3 sharpen, IOS6400
+3 sharpen, IOS6400

I just really like the images this camera delivers. The Canon Log does a nice job of holding highlights outdoors and seeing into the shadows.  Will try and NR the 6400 footage above.  There is a little red creeping into some of the images but nothing that can’t be fixed.  With the ND could be a bit of IR pollution as well.  I would shoot with 0 sharpening and sharpen in post or perhaps try with +1.

As always when trying new gear: You want MORE time! 🙂

One more thing that impressed me were the 8megapixel still I was able to pull from the footage.  To be able to do frame grabs with that resolution will be a great new advantage of working with 4K.

Everyone is so quick to judge stuff nowadays.  Equipment especially and lots of judging simply by specs and whats on a piece of paper.  The 1DC.  Yes it is a Jpeg compressed 8 bit 422 image maker costing $12K.   Is there noise at higher ISO’s? Sure.  Does it have real audio connectors? No.   But seriously, does it all this matter if you are able to produce a really nice looking image using lights and a decent stop? No it doesn’t matter. It is funny but nowadays some people are almost disapointed when they can’t shoot a clean image without noise, with no lights at 25 600 ISO… 🙂

All images are exported as .DPX out of Premiere and the images above as saved as .JPG (Qual 12) in photoshop.

These “tests” are totally unscientific and are just for me to get a sence of what this camera is capable of. There was no mattebox and filters were held up against lens. No monitor or view finder.   All views are my own and no one asked me to do this on their behalf.

For .DPX files and from-camera-video-clips go to link below. If you grade and repost please credit source:

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/s9f5pmnfi3rvoud/40OVBuP-6V

Thanks to Scandinavian Photo Malmö for your assistance.  Thanks also Fredric Tirheden for helping out today.

 

More Canon Cine lenses

Canon just announced another 2 lenses to add to their EOS Cine line. A 14mm T3.1 and a 135mm T2.2.

From Canon:
“The Cinema EOS System is designed to support creative expression, and the launch of these new wide-angle and telephoto primes means our EF Cinema Lens line-up now offers the broadest focal length range in its class¹,” said Kieran Magee, Marketing Director, Professional Imaging, Canon Europe. “These new lenses truly reflect the vision that the Cinema EOS System is based on – combining industry-leading technologies with professionally-optimised designs so videographers can tell stories exactly as they intended to.”

Outstanding performance
Designed to work with Canon’s EF mount, each model incorporates cutting-edge optical technologies, including anomalous dispersion glass and large diameter aspherical lenses to deliver high resolution images, as well as Canon’s latest broadcast lens coatings to reduce ghosting and flare. Additionally, an 11-blade aperture diaphragm provides beautifully soft background blur when a subject is isolated from its background.

Both lenses utilise the company’s unsurpassed heritage in optical design and include electronic contacts to enable communication between the camera and lens. Each lens features a full-frame image circle that offers compatibility with both 35mm and industry-standard Super 35mm formats, allowing videographers the flexibility to pair either lens with Canon’s range of Cinema EOS System cameras or EOS Digital SLRs.

Class-leading design
Designed for the working professional, both new models feature a high-grade professional design offering advanced operability. Compact form factors are optimised for motion picture production, with unified front lens diameter and gear positions that provide easy operability – eliminating the need to adjust rig set-ups when changing lenses mid-shoot. Widespread compatibility with standard third party accessories also offers outstanding flexibility during use, whether on-set or in the field.

Both the CN-E 14mm T3.1 L F and the CN-E 135mm T2.2 L feature markings on angled surfaces on either side of the lens barrel, making focus and aperture settings easy to read from behind or either side of the camera. A focus rotation angle of approximately 300 degrees facilitates precise focusing adjustments during shooting, while the focus markings can be switched from metric to imperial labelling as required. Innovative glass constructions also counter barrel expansion and contraction to avoid temperature-induced marking discrepancies, making each lens ideal for use in a range of different conditions.