Going on a scout…?

How often do you scout a location before a shoot?? For films and commercials it’s almost mandatory but for lots of other situations producers see this a cost, nothing more. I always ask, and often insist, on a Locations scout because I know the value of it. Sometimes it’s not possible due to travel and budget but always try. Even if your going across the globe, travel in a day early and try to hit a few locations before the rest of the crew arrives. The Time saved on shooting day knowing all you noted on the scout is invaluable. Here are some of the things I look for while scouting, in no particular order.

Basically I look for light, power, angles.

* bring a camera along. Pictures will help you remember better and show others.
* bringing a DSLR will give you great metadata such as a focal length, exposure etc to help you in your planning. Most cameras today also have video recording so you can actually shoot a short sequence.
* a great app for your phone is Artemis. It’s basically a viewfinder which allows you to switch between different sensors and lenses to judge composition. Take snapshots and save metadata along with comments.

IMG_2456.JPG

* a Lightmeter is always nice.

* an app like “360” which stitches together multiple pictures for a great overview of your location which won’t fit into a single picture.
* if you intend to use “house power” definitely Take a picture of the fuse box and other electrical hook ups.
* In an old factory or house for example bring a “power-pen” which lights up and makes a sound if there is actually power in an outlet.

IMG_2099.JPG

*try to get close to ground floor. Carrying/loading equipment to the third floor takes time and trying to light through a window if far trickier that if you’re on the ground floor. 🙂
* sun scout or sun seeker are 2 apps showing where the sun will be at a particular time during the day. These apps have helped me soooo many times and are remarkably accurate.
* if your not snapping pictures everywhere make a small sketch of the layout including windows etc.
* iPad for notes or sending pictures from DSLR.
* Parking. How close, unloading zones close to the door, meters etc.
* Noise. Your sound person will be pleased to know you considered their job, and in turn saved countless dropped takes. Look for potential noise like the garbage truck the has its daily visit to the hotel across the street between noon and 2pm….

Small things that may seem silly will make a huge difference once you and the rest of the crew show up to shoot.

Ahhh one more thing: look at the actual location if it suits the story, natural lighting works and the angles for your shots will make you look good…. 😉

What things do you look for when your location scouting… ?

Browse app iOS

I have all my photos and files backup up, in several location, but the main backup station is in my basement on a NAS (network attached storage).
I can access this from all over the place and it’s hooked up to my computer, TV’s and home cinema via LAN and WiFi. But one thing I was missing was a good app to browse my NAS via my iPad mini and iOS.
I searched and found a few different one but decided on the “File Browser”.
20140715-210932-76172838.jpg

20140715-210932-76172724.jpg

It lets me browse all kinds of file but for me mainly pictures, Jpg and even Raw files, movies and and download, email or even Chromecast or Airplay them to a screen. It loads thumbnail quickly and if your wifi is fast it’s almost like browsing on your computer.
You can access all your favorite clouds such as Dropbox, Box GoogleDrive and via FTP and WebDAV.

There is a free version if you want to try-before-you-buy.
Check it out.
http://www.stratospherix.com/products/filebrowser/

Disclaimer: No relation or ask, just a cool app I found which helps my daily computer needs… 😉

 

keep is organized – Omnigraffle

I’ve heard some great things about this program and thought I’d give it a try.  It is an easy to use diagramming program for both mac and iPad.omnigraff1

I had to create a first draft of a technical setup to send off to a client.  omnigraff2

Draggin’ and drop’n icons and adding text made this very easy and created a more professional look than if I’d drawn it… 🙂

Give it a try. Omnigraffle.

Disclaimer: No connection with Omnigraffle

 

Cine meter iPhone app

Today I heard of a really cool new iPhone app called Cine Meter. It is a shutter priority reflected light meter app that shows reading within 1/3 stop and is able to calibrate within 1/10 stop to your own meter. It seems very accurate in my first few shots. It has also has a waveform monitor, false color and white balance. I can’t wait to play some more with this thing and see how it performs.
The app is developed by Adam Wilt
20130118-094402.jpg

20130118-094451.jpg

PicFrame – Fun with art

Today I played around with a new iPhone app called PicFrame. It allows you to put several pictures into a frame. Makes for easy upload to Instagram, Twitter or Facebook.
Here is my first attempt at it.
The app has tons of different frames and is customizable as far as colors, fonts and frame size is concerned.
Adding pictures and resizing is a snap.
There are also a few color/contrast filters you can add to the pictures.

Well worth $1. 🙂

20120721-223918.jpg

All pictures shot on iPhone 4s.

Artemis

In the series “Top iPhone apps” here is my favorite right now.  “Artemis” which act as a directors viewfinder.   I just got back from a locations scout in the north of Sweden. Later this week we travel up to Kiruna to shoot a commercial for a tire company.  A location scout was really needed to have some clear locations in mind once we all get up there.   So you may ask: why buy an app instead of just using the camera in your iPhone??

What is so great with this app is that you pick a camera and lenses and it will allow you to see what you’ll see once you bring the gear on location. What will the 85mm lens look like here?  Will the entire house fit in frame on a 25mm lens from this distance??  

And even cooler is being able to save a snapshot with added metadata (like location name), lens choice and at what angle (tilt) the shot was taken. GPS location is also added to each frame.
The one downside, not the apps fault, is the lens on the iPhone.  Any lens choice in the app wider than “23mm!!” (on a super 35mm dig sensor i.e. Sony F3) will be wider than the Iphone can picture.  The app will then add an orange marker as show what’s missing.

This is a pricy app at 30 USD but definitely worth every penny.   Thanks to Artemis I was able to deliver an email with 19 pictures with lens data to the producer in a far away land, all before leaving for the airport. Really really helpful when talking storyboard over the phone… This app is also available on Android.

 

Sun Scout

Here is another great app I use a lot for both filming and location scouting. It is called Sun Scout and will show the sun’s path at any point during the day. So if you need to know when the sun will sneak over that rooftop behind you and hit your location this is the app that will tell you. It is not 100% accurate but really close enough. You can also change the setting to see the path at a different date, nice feature for a scout.
This time of year in Sweden finding the sun requires a LOT more than this app though… 🙂

Great app for your iphone at $10.

location scout?

One thing I always want to bring back from a location scout are a few pictures of what everything looks like.  The rooms, how many windows, doors, where is the light coming from etc etc.  I recently found a great app for this called 360.

It simply allows you to take a “sweep” of the room and the app stitches together everything to a nice picture to go. A well spent 99 cents!

Here are a few examples from a recent scout.